MALM

 

Overview of Master of arts in Leadership & Management (MALM)

 

 This course offers students with a theological background the opportunity to do advanced work that will prepare them for further studies and for ministries as pastors, teachers, seminary professors and church leaders in Ethiopia and beyond. This MA program does not repeat content already taught at the Bachelor level, but rather offers more depth of content and especially equips students with tools by which they can grow in their own critical thinking and research skills. Core courses in each area give basic tools and understanding that students will build on and put into practice in upper level courses.

 

Three areas of concentration are offered:

 

 

·         Biblical Studies (with Old Testament or New Testament specialization) 

 

The Biblical Studies concentration equips students with advanced knowledge of the nature and content of biblical and extra-biblical literature and of biblical theology. Students further develop their hermeneutical skills, from methods for finding the meaning of a text to methods for explaining its significance to life and ministry in today’s world.

 

 

·         Theological and Historical Studies (with Systematic Theology or Church History specialization)

 

 

This area gives students the opportunity to learn to think theologically about the integration of faith with practice and biblical studies with contemporary issues, by drawing on the rich resources of 20 centuries of Christian history and theological thinking.  Students will gain an understanding of the complex patterns of theological practices and beliefsfound in the Christian world, including theological belief and practice in Ethiopia and Africa in general.

 

 

·         Missions and Practical Theology

 

This area is designed to help students think missiologically and to cultivate theological and practical knowledge of ministry across cultures as well as within their own culture. Courses are intended to connect the Ethiopian experience with God’s mission throughout the ages, and to encourage the participation of Ethiopian churches in the worldwide expansion of God’s kingdom. Students are also being encouraged to think about the practical application of their studies within the context of their ministries.

 

 


 

 


Master of Arts in Development Studies (MADS)

 

Course Descriptions

 

 

 

Inter-Programme Courses

 

EM 601 Research Methods and Academic Writing. This course is required for all Master of Arts students who write a thesis as part of their programme. Students must take this course in their first year so that skills learned can be used throughout their academic career at EGST.

 

The purpose of this course is to equip students with practical skills that improve their chances for success in the field of academic theology. Students develop the skills needed to write a well-organised and persuasive academic paper. These include the ability to define and limit a writing topic, to formulate a thesis statement, to construct a well-organised paper with a meaningful flow of ideas, to introduce and conclude the paper appropriately, and to present the written paper in a professional manner. The second focus of the course is on the skills needed to collect and evaluate data for research projects, both from the internet and from students’ own field research.

 

PT 503 and 504 Personal Development—1 and 2. These two courses are taken during the first and second semester of a student’s first year and are designed to assist each student in deepening his or her spiritual journey while at EGST.  The high academic demands at EGST can often leave students spiritually impoverished, with little time for personal devotion or spiritual growth.  Academic work can also be very isolating, with low priority given to nurturing relationships with fellow students.  These two courses challenge and encourage students to grow in both their “inward” and “outward” spiritual journeys, through guided scripture reading, reflection, and weekly meetings with two other students in their programme.

 

In addition, Personal Development students meet monthly in a group with 9-12 students and a faculty member Mentor. The purpose of group meetings is to offer support to one another, whether involving personal issues of spiritual growth and discipleship, health, family, church, ministry, academic issues, etc

Thesis.       Each Master of Arts student will complete a supervised written thesis of approximately 10,000 – 12,000 words in his or her field of study/area of concentration. The purpose of this paper is (1) to allow the student to explore in more depth a topic of interest within his or her field of study/area of concentration; and (2) to demonstrate the student’s ability to produce an extended piece of writing combining knowledgeable interaction with scholarly sources and a well-organized and sustained argument supporting a thesis statement. While this paper does not have to demonstrate independent research, it should show individuality of thought and relevance to the Ethiopian context. A Master of Arts student concentrating in Mission may, in consultation with their Thesis Supervisor, the head of Mission and Practical Theology and the Dean of Studies, substitute an independent field project and written report comparable to the 10,000-12,000 word paper.

 Biblical Studies

 BS 501 Scripture and Methods of Interpretation. Students will consider issues relating to the transmission and canon of Scripture and then deal with the doctrine of Scripture.  Students will also acquire interpretive methods and skills for understanding and explaining biblical texts.  The role of the Holy Spirit in the process of biblical interpretation will also be addressed.

 

 BS 502 Pentateuch and Narratives. This course presents the legal and narrative sections of the OT.  Firstly, students will consider the literary, historical and thematic features of these books.  Secondly, selected texts will be examined in detail so that students can gain a clear understanding of context and genre.  Throughout, particular consideration will be given to the role of these texts in understanding the New Testament, the importance of God’s covenant community and relevance for today’s Christians, particularly in the Ethiopian context.

 

 BS 503 Prophets and Wisdom Literature. This course introduces the writings of the prophets and the wisdom thinkers and how they challenged and taught Israel about what it meant to live as God’s people in their particular historical situations.  Students will gain an overview of the literary, historical and thematic features of these writings and engage in detailed examination of selected texts towards understanding the relevance of both the method and content of these writings to the Ethiopian church today. 

 

 BS 504 Gospels and Acts. This course surveys the four canonical gospels and the book of Acts. Special attention is given to the unique literary and theological contributions of the Synoptists: Matthew, Mark and Luke. The distinct character of the Gospel of John is examined and contrasted with the Synoptists. The historical character of the book of Acts as well as its theological witness are addressed. Engagement with the Ethiopian context is made where appropriate.

 

 BS 505 Pauline and General Letters. This course examines the Pauline and deutero-Pauline letters, the General Epistles and Revelation by surveying the content of each book for their historical setting, literary form, and theological message, and by exegeting selected passages. Emphasis is also given to the development of hermeneutical skills, from methods for finding the meaning of a text to methods for explaining its significance to life and ministry in today’s Ethiopia.

 

 Theological and Historical studies

 ST 501 God, Creation and Humanity. Students explore the doctrine of God in relation to creation and humanity. The course considers God’s character, personality and attributes, and the nature of his governance of the world. The course also considers issues relating to the doctrine of creation, humanity’s place within creation, humanity’s destiny, and God’s relationship with creation and humanity.  

 

 ST 502 Christ and Salvation. Students will gain a general understanding of the ways in which Christ is presented in the NT and acquire basic knowledge about historical and theological aspects of the development of diverse christological views in East and West. The course will also aid students to grasp the meaning of salvation in biblical and other traditions, relate the saving work of Christ to the person of Christ, critically analyse the kind of christological and soteriological understandings that exist in Ethiopia, and to develop and articulate coherent convictions concerning the person and saving work of Christ.

 

 CH 501 History of Christianity. This course considers key moments in the development of Christianity both in the West and in Africa.  Students consider the impact of key leaders and crucial turning points in the expansion and development of Christianity, beginning in the early 2nd century. Special focus is given to the emergence of Christianity as a non-Western religion, especially in Africa. 

 

 Mission

 MI 502 The Church and Mission. This course will explore ecclesiological issues relating, for example, to the nature and identity of the church, the unity of the church, ecumenism and the role of the church in the world. The course will also consider the biblical meaning of mission, the significance of church in mission and the missionary movement from biblical, historical, theological and strategic perspectives. 

 

 Practical theology

PT 505 Worldview and Spirituality. This course will provide an overview of the concept of “worldview” and how it is expressed in both Christian and non-Christian ways in the modern world, and especially in Ethiopia. Students will explore their own worldview, and how it determines both their spirituality and leadership style. Theories of workplace spirituality in light of anthropological, psychological, philosophical, religious, and organizational perspectives will also be presented.

 

 

Development Studies Core Courses

 

 DS 501 Project Planning, Evaluation and Management. This course is designed to develop practical skills for the planning, implementation, managing and evaluating of development projects, especially in relation to small scale community and church projects.

 

 DS 502  Issues in Sustainable Development. This course deals with some of the enduring issues relating to sustainable development including, but not limited to, the relationship between and challenges of demographic change, economic growth, social justice and ecological issues.

 

 DS 503 HIV/AIDS Mainstreaming. Students will consider the necessity of and study the skills necessary to mainstream HIV and AIDS into Theological Education, various projects and programs and different institutions including schools, healthcare centres, etc.   The course also deals with mainstreaming HIV/AIDS in relation to associated developmental issues such as nutrition, population, gender and health. 

 

 DS 504 Gender and Health. This course introduces and examines the importance and relevance of gender issues in the health sector and vice versa. It examines issues relating to women, reproductive and child health in general and in Ethiopia in particular. Anthropological and contextual theological reflections will also be considered. Further, health system and policy issues pertaining to gender and health will be addressed.

 

 DS 506 Practicum. This course requires students to undertake practical work (observation and critical assessment) on issues relevant to gender, health and community development. Students are expected to apply the theories, principles and tools covered in the entire programme while attempting to work out a project proposal to solve community problems. The course has two parts. The first part involves a guided investigation aimed at critically assessing a real community  project (implemented preferably by non-governmental organisations, churches or para-church organisations). To this end, EGST will forge links with Church Based Development Organizations (e.g. ACT Alliance members). The second part involves presenting students’ findings at a symposium to be organised by EGST so as to give the wider community (including scholars, community leaders and development practitioners) an opportunity to learn from the findings.[e1] 

 

 Concentration Courses

 

 HIV/AIDS, Health and Theology

 

 DS 511 Introduction to HIV/AIDS. The course introduces the general scientific and medical facts about HIV/AIDS to enable students to better understand its clinical and epidemiological phenomena. This course considers issues related to HIV: the organism, modes of transmission, course of infection and immunological phenomena, prevention of HIV, treatment of HIV, and treatment of HIV related opportunistic infections and co-infections. 

 

 DS 512 Impacts of HIV/AIDS on Society. In this course students will discover the extent of the social, economic, demographic and other impacts of HIV/AIDS at individual, family and community levels. The course will also deal with impact assessment and mitigation.

 

 DS 513 Responses to HIV/AIDS in Church and Society. In this course students will learn of the various models of response to the HIV/AIDS situation in the community and society. They will also learn to evaluate the various responses of churches, and other social institutions (GOs and NGOs) to the HIV/AIDS crisis towards developing models for local initiatives.

 

 DS 521 Psycho-social Issues in Gender and Health. In this course students will explore the various psycho-social problems associated with gender violence, cultural practices, humanitarian social crisis and HIV/AIDS. The student will develop an understanding and theological basis for pastoral care and counselling including the knowledge and skills of counselling and principles for addressing psycho-social issues in humanitarian emergencies.

 

 DS 522 Religion and Public Health. This course explores the interface between religion and public health in sub-Saharan Africa. The course will briefly introduce public health, the political economy of public health, religious health assets (tangible and intangible), the contribution of faith-based initiatives, and methodological issues (tools for assessing religious health assets). Students will have an appreciation of African religious health assets and their contribution in the process of addressing issues relating to public health in general and HIV/AIDS and gender in particular.

 

 DS 524 Gender, Sexuality and HIV/AIDS. In this course, students will explore socio-cultural understanding and consequential problems in the areas of gender, sexuality, marriage and family. In addition, students will study the Biblical and Christian views pertaining to these issues in order to be equipped to critically analyse and challenge socio-cultural practices.

 

 Gender, Health and Theology

 

 DS 521 Psycho-social Issues in Gender and Health. In this course students will explore the various psycho-social problems associated with gender violence, cultural practices, humanitarian social crisis and HIV/AIDS. The student will develop an understanding and theological basis for pastoral care and counselling including the knowledge and skills of counselling and principles for addressing psycho-social issues in humanitarian emergencies.

 

 DS 522 Religion and Public Health. This course explores the interface between religion and public health in sub-Saharan Africa. The course will briefly introduce public health, the political economy of public health, religious health assets (tangible and intangible), the contribution of faith-based initiatives, and methodological issues (tools for assessing religious health assets). Students will have an appreciation of African religious health assets and their contribution in the process of addressing issues relating to public health in general and HIV/AIDS and gender in particular.

 

 DS 523 Gender, Church and Politics. This course will examine how gender issues are understood (both culturally and theologically) and handled in the ecclesiastical and political contexts. The course will also deal with the principles of political leadership, accountability, participation, transparency and inclusiveness as crucial requirements for development, democracy and economic growth. It also focuses on women's participation in decision making, leadership and politics within the church and society and the challenges they face.

 

 DS 524 Gender, Sexuality and HIV/AIDS. In this course, students will explore socio-cultural understanding and consequential problems in the areas of gender, sexuality, marriage and family. In addition, students will study the Biblical and Christian views pertaining to these issues in order to be equipped to critically analyse and challenge socio-cultural practices.

 

 DS 525 Gender and Philosophy. This course examines the importance of theory in understanding and acting within the social system. It explains how theoretical perspectives define problems differently and how they suggest different solutions. The course further explores the concept and evolution of theories in gender and introduces a number of feminist theoretical frameworks and explains how these perspectives are related to each other and the prevailing understanding of gender.

 

 DS 526 Introduction to Reproductive Health. The course will introduce students to the basics of reproductive health, its history, definition, components and principles. Reproductive health rights, reproductive health movements and the Ethiopian situation in the various aspects of reproductive health will be discussed.

 

 Community Development and Theology

 

 DS 531 Classic Theories of Economic Growth and Development. This course aims at exploring the historical and intellectual evolution in thinking about how and why development does or doesn’t take place in a given country or part of the world. This will be done by examining the major (and often competing) development theories/models. The course tries to show that each of the competing theories/models offers valuable insights into and a useful perspective on the nature of the development process. What is more, approaches to analyse economic growth will be introduced along with the review of alternative theories/models of development. The course will also introduce the evaluation of development discourses in Ethiopia (during the Imperial Era, the Dergue and the present government); and the philosophy underpinning the current Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP) and Ethiopia’s vision for a climate resilient green economy (CRGE). 

 

 DS 532 Christian Faith and Development in Africa. The church in Africa is believed to hold a position of reverence, moral legitimacy, and influence. What is now known as holistic development has been the approach of the African Church from its inception. This course will try to explore the contributions of the Church in Africa in bringing about holistic development to the Continent at large, and the poor and disadvantaged in particular. The efforts and achievements of the church in proving basic education and health care services; introduction of appropriate technologies; empowerment of marginalized groups, etc. will get due emphasis. Students are encouraged to identify specific cases (countries) and critically assess the contributions of churches there. Some of the negative impacts associated with the church’s interventions (e.g. injection of a general sense of dependency and creation of what is often called ‘rice-Christians) will be examined by students during their case studies.

 

 DS 533 Micro Enterprise Development. This course will endeavour to aquaint the participants with basic knowledge about microenterprise development, MED methodologies, financial issues related to MED, and issues related to leadership and governance of MED. Students will be encouraged to visit micro-enterprises in their vicinity and have a firsthand information on the benefits of and challenges associated with MED.

 

 DS 534 Food Security Policies and Strategies. It is often argued that the ‘goal of ensuring food security has to take precedence over virtually all other economic goals’. This course will try to present the diverse forces behind food insecurity and famine in the Horn of Africa in general and Ethiopia in particular. Measures proposed against the problem will also be presented in a greater depth. Issues like disaster risk reduction, the early warning system and coping mechanisms employed during food shortages will be emphasized. The special contributions of non-governmental organizations in general and faith-based organizations in particular in ensuring food security will be highlighted. Students are encouraged to analyse food security situations in different settings including, but not limited to, the situation in highland areas with dense population, in lowland areas with nomadic pattern of life and urban settings.

 

 

DS 535 Appropriate Technology and Poverty Alleviation. This course is aimed at developing the skills of its participants to apply some of the technologies that accelerate the pace of the process in poverty alleviation and its eventual eradication. Appropriate technologies related to agricultural production and processing; forestry and environmental protection; and energy production and use will be dealt with. Special emphasis will be put on technologies that reduce women’s drudgery both in urban and rural settings.

 

 

 


 [e1]High risk

 

 

 

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